Home / Forums / Universal Design for Learning (UDL) / UDL is really for ALL teachers

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  • Joy Pak
    Guest
    Post count: 98

    Initially when I started I thought to myself that here is another layer that teachers have to add onto their ever increasing demands to engage and retain students. However when I started to understand more about UDL, I didn’t realize that I unknowingly implemented several best practices already in my classes. The Equity Checklist was a great way to self-evaluate and self-reflect whether I incorporated culturally responsive teaching practices in the classroom. I find that I am more strategic and purposeful in teaching since I want to routinely use as many equitable best practices. It may be more work for the teacher to implement equitable practices but if the results creates a motivated, more knowledgeable, goal-oriented student, then it’s worth the time and effort.

    Erika Husby
    Guest
    Post count: 98

    Hi Joy,
    I appreciate your point about how teachers may perceive UDL. I think a helpful introduction to UDL can be asking teachers what we already are doing that align with the principles of UDL so that we can understand the theory through concrete examples. Then we can work on what we can improve to benefit the students, even if that means more time and effort from the teacher. Teaching is not an assembly line!

    Julie Kletzing
    Guest
    Post count: 98

    Thank you, Joy, for sharing that UDL and this Equity course have been so useful for you. I feel the same. The Equity Checklist was also helpful to me– very eye-opening. For example, that I engaged more with the students in the front half of the room. Great thought, that teaching is not an assembly line! Every class and every student has so many facets.

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